Learning Goals for Rotation One

Learning GoalsBy the end of this rotation I will be able to:

– investigate the structures and functions of cells, and the environmental factors that influence cellular activity.

Activity One: Cell Cycle and Cancer

LEARNING GOAL OF ROTATION

We will investigate the structures and functions of cells, and the environmental factors that influence cellular activity.

  SUCCESS CRITERIA

  • We will develop an overview of the historic development of our understanding of carcinogens (cancer causing agents).
  • We will understand the cell cycle and cell division timing.
  • We will develop an understanding of mutations required within the cell that causes cancer development.
  • We will reflect about the growth in our understanding of cancer.
  • We will determine what we might change in our lives to limit the potential of having cancer.

TODAY’S WORK

Download this worksheet file it has the instructions and can be filed in as you work through the video clips below.  Keep in mind that you will be asked to reflect on your learnings after you have completed the worksheet (either a video blog or a podcast – voice recording).   Your reflection should be organized and should cover the following items…

  • The most interesting thing I learned about cancer today was…. because… (give at least 2 reasons why it was interesting).
  • Cancer touches all of our lives in some way, how have you or will you try to lessen the chances of cancer impacting your life?
  • **These podcasts or video blogs will be collected and shared with the class.  Post on Learninhood under the rotation post as a comment.
  • ** If you need to complete this task online (if you did not finish the Tablet activity in class) you can access the videos and transcripts from the links below…

Activity Two: Cell Organelles and their Job

LEARNING GOAL OF ROTATION

We will investigate the structures and functions of cells, and the environmental factors that influence cellular activity using light microscopes (physical and virtual) and slide staining procedures.

SUCCESS CRITERIA

  • We will understand each of the organelles’ jobs within the cell.
  • We will be able to recognize how the organelle’s job will affect the cell if it is removed.
  • We will be able to identify the organelles by appearance.
  • We will be able to label a plant and animal cell.

TODAY’S WORk

  • Work thorough the ‘Cells Alive’ interactive plant and animal cells.  Complete the ‘Fill in the Blank’ worksheet provided.  Label all cell organelles as you complete the worksheet.  Try colouring your cells to make sure you have identified each of the organelles – what they look like and the job they perform in the cell.  If you have done the worksheet on the computer you can submit to the dropbox.
  • Go to ‘The Incredible MegaCell’ – it is a comic book and a organelle GAME!!  Now how quickly can you save Professor MegaCell?  Sort his organelles by the jobs that they do and restore them to his body – Do it in time and Prof. MegaCell lives!  ** Class record is 13s !!
Activity Three: Animal Mitosis Microscope Lab

LEARNING GOAL OF ROTATION

We will investigate the structures and functions of cells, and the environmental factors that influence cellular activity using light microscopes (physical and virtual) and slide staining procedures.

SUCCESS CRITERIA

  • We will understand and describe the stages of mitosis.
  • We will develop a working understanding of microscopes and the names of their components.
  • We will identify these stages in ‘real life’ with the Whitefish Blastula.
  • We will be able to create “biological drawings” of “Field of View”.

TODAY’S WORK

Part One: Read the Content.  It will give you a detailed account of how mitosis (the act of cell division) takes place.  Note any information that is important or details that you did not already know (review of grade 10 science concept).

Part Two: Now click on the ‘Assignment’ tab at the top of the screen.  Download the worksheet and open the ‘Microscope MME’.  This will take you to a virtual microscope lab.  Complete all sections of the worksheet (do the physical drawings on a separate sheet of paper so you can practice your drawing technique – submit in class).  Submit to the dropbox provided.

Activity Four: Biological Drawings and Cells

LEARNING GOAL FOR ROTATION

We will investigate the structures and functions of cells, and the environmental factors that influence cellular activity using light microscopes (physical and virtual) and slide staining procedures.

Cheek Cell

SUCCESS CRITERIA OF LESSON

  • We will understand how magnification works, microscope terms, and how to do slide preparation.
  • We will learn how to make “biological drawings” and the skills required.
  • We will integrate the ‘real life’ with textbook figures.
  • We will evaluate staining methods.
  • We will cement differences between plant and animal cells.

TODAY’S WORK

Using our textbook ‘Investigating Science 10′, turn to pages 22-24.  There are two ‘Inquiry Activities’ to complete.  You will be responsible for completing the ‘Procedure’, ‘Analyzing and Interpreting’, ‘Skill Practice’ and ‘Forming Conclusions’ sections.

You will need to get a microscope, blank paper and a pencil too!

** You may hand in your drawings and submit your report to the dropbox.

How to do a Biological Diagram

Biological diagrams are used to convey accurate information about what is seen through the microscope.  Use the following rules to guide you as you make biological diagrams.

  1. Use blank unlined paper
  2. Use only an HB pencil. Do not colour or shade. Stippling may be used to shade.
  3. Draw what you are looking at through the eye piece as accurately as possible using up most of the paper.  Do not make the drawing small. It should occupy about 2/3 of paper.
  4. Label the parts you recognize using a ruler.  The labels should be on the right side or the other and the lines should match up.  Print the labels.
  5. In the bottom right corner put the:
    • Power (in which you made the drawing)
    • Actual Size of the specimen
    • Drawing Size
  1. Title the specimen.
  2. Put your name in the top right corner.


Actual Size

You will need to know the diameter of the field of view for the objective lens that you are using. Most light microscopes have the following field diameters:

Low Power:                4.0mm
Medium Power:         1.6mm
High Power                0.4mm

In order to calculate actual size, you must look at the specimen through the eye piece and estimate how many of the cells would fit across the diameter of the field of view.

Example Icon Example

You estimate that 5 of the cells you are studying would fit across the diameter of the field of view while you use high power.

The field diameter at high power is 0.4mm

Actual Size  =                       Diameter of field of view                           
                           Estimated number of times the cell fits across the field 
                        
                        =   0.4
5

The actual size of the cell you are looking at is 0.08 mm

Drawing Size/Magnification

When you have completed your calculation of the actual size, you must measure your drawing with a ruler.  If you are using centimetres, convert it to the units you which you used for the actual size.
E.g.  15 cm = 150 mm

Now calculate the drawing size/magnification

equation

This means that your drawing is magnified 1875x larger than the actual specimen.

See the example below. Please note this drawing is from a microscope capable of magnifying to 1600x. This is about 4x greater than a normal high school microscope. Therefore, structures, such as the mitochondria while shown in this diagram, would not normally be seen in a high school setting.

A hand-drawn image of a cell under a microscope.

Activity Five: Play Clay Cells

LEARNING GOAL OF ROTATION

We will investigate the structures and functions of cells, and the environmental factors that influence cellular activity using light microscopes (physical and virtual) and slide staining procedures.

SUCCESS CRITERIA

  • We will develop an understanding of ‘size’ of organelles in relation to cell size.
  • We will review the differences between plant and animals cells.

 

TODAY’S WORK

Complete the ‘Play-clay Cell’ activity!!!!  Using the Play-clay construct a plant and animal cell by using the ‘Organelle Proportions’ page (see attached).  Include all organelles needed for a plant cell and an animal cell… use any of the colours you want.  Now you can either draw by hand or Google Sketchup (3D structural diagram creation) or take a picture (via your cell phone or camera).  All organelles need to be labeled (off to the right hand side!) on your final creation.  Please submit digital pictures to the dropbox.

Activity Six: