Learning Goals for Rotation One

Learning GoalsBy the end of this rotation I will be able to:

  • Analyze chemical reactions used in a variety of applications, and assess their impact on society and the environment
  • Investigate different types of reactions
  • demonstrate an understanding of chemical reactions
Activity One: Chemical Reactions and Equations

Please read through the ‘Introduction to Chemical Reactions’ (section 4.1 Nelson).  Take any notes that you need to.  Do questions 1-5 on page 155.

Activity Two: Types of Reactions

Please log into the virtual classroom and complete the Types of Reactions activity.  Please take any notes that you may need for later from the content section and then complete the assignment.  You will submit your work to the dropboxthen you will do a self assessment and reflection and resubmit your corrected file.

Activity Three: Types of Reactions - Lab

*** Use this Organization Sheet to record observations and do your Analysis.
Organization Sheet for Lab.

 Lab

Introduction

Chemical reactions can be classified in many ways.  One classification system involves four general types of reactions: combustion, synthesis, decomposition, single replacement, and double replacement.

In this experiment you will investigate these different types of reactions by predicting the products of each reaction and using experimental evidence to test those predictions.

Purpose
To become more familiar with the types of chemical reactions.
To identify reaction type, and write a balanced chemical equation on the basis of experimental evidence.

Hypothesis
For each reaction you will perform, write a chemical equation, including physical states.  Predict which type of reaction each reaction will produce.

Material
Solids
Zn, Cu, Mg, S, MnO2, NaHCO3

Solutions
H2O2, CuSO4, AgNO3, AlCl3, Pb(NO3)2, KI, NH4OH, HCl, Na2CO3, limewater(Ca(OH)2)

Apparatus:
well plate, pipettes, droppers, crucible tongs, test tube clamp, test tube, one-hole rubber stopper,
glass delivery tube, graduated cylinder, pH paper, litmus paper, wood splint, matches, Bunsen
burner, spatula, steel wool

Safety

Safety goggles and lab aprons should always be worn when working with chemicals.
This lab will be performed using small quantities of chemicals (micro-scale chemistry). Use no more than 5 drops of each solution. The results shown in this lab activity have been diluted in test tubes in order to enhance the visual results of the images.
Keep in mind that a reaction may not be immediately apparent.
Repetition of the procedure may be helpful to confirm the results.

Procedure
PART A:

  1. Place about 10 drops of aluminum chloride solution in a well plate.
  2. Add a small piece of zinc and observe.

PART B:

  1. In a well plate add 10 drops of lead (II) nitrate.
  2. Add 10 drops of potassium iodide and observe.

PART C:

  1. Place about 10 drops of silver nitrate solution in a well plate.
  2. Add a small piece of copper wire.
  3. Let the setup stand for 5 minutes and observe.

PART D:

  1. In a well plate add 10 drops of ammonium hydroxide.
  2. Add 10 drops of hydrochloric acid and observe.

PART E:

  1. In a well plate add 10 drops of sodium carbonate.
  2. Add 10 drops of copper (II) sulphate and observe.

PART F:

  1. Using crucible tongs, hold a 2 cm piece of magnesium ribbon in the burner flame until the magnesium starts to burn.  DO NOT LOOK DIRECTLY AT THE FLAME.
  2. Hold the burning magnesium directly over the watch glass.
  3. When the ribbon stops burning, place the remains on the watch glass.
  4. Turn off the burner and observe.

PART G:

  1. Place about 10 drops of copper (II) sulphate solution in a well plate.
  2. Add a small piece of magnesium and observe.

PART H:

  1. Place approximately 5 mL of hydrogen peroxide in a test tube, add a pinch of manganese dioxide, and observe.  Note that the manganese dioxide does not take part in the reaction; it is only there to act as a catalyst to accelerate the reaction.
  2. Test the gas produced by inserting a glowing splint into the mouth of the test tube.

PART I:

  1. Polish a piece of copper foil with steel wool until is clean and shiny.
  2. Vigorously rub the copper with a lump of sulphur until the foil changes in appearance.

PART J:

  1. Place approximately 2 g of sodium hydrogen carbonate in a test tube.
  2. Fit the test tube with a one-hole stopper and delivery tube, and clamp it.
  3. Place 5 mL of limewater in a second test tube, and place the end of the delivery tube in the limewater.
  4. Gently heat the sodium hydrogen carbonate and observe the limewater.
  5. Remove the delivery tube from the limewater before you discontinue heating.
  6. There are three products formed during this reaction, one of which is water.

Observations and Analysis

*** Use this Organization Sheet to record observations and do your Analysis.
Organization Sheet for Lab.

Write a sentence describing each reaction with experimental evidence from your observations.
Write the balanced chemical equation for each reaction.
Classify each of the reactions as a synthesis, decomposition, single displacement, or double displacement.

Conclusion

Briefly state the general results for the lab.  This should be no more than 2 sentences.

 Image result for caution sign Stop before you proceed

Please ensure that your lab report contains the following:

  • title page
  • observations table
  • analysis
  • conclusion
Activity Four: Combustion Reactions

Please read ‘Combustion Reactions’  in the textbook – page 137 to 143.  Take any jot notes that you will need to reference, do the review questions on page 145 (Q1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 9, and 10).

Activity Five: Lithium Recycling

Please complete the research and analysis on your own (40 minutes) and then as a group complete the ‘Take Action – Plan’ as a group discussion.  You will be responsible to submit your research (with references) and notes from the discussion in your group.

Activity Six: Oxides

Please log into the virtual classroom and complete the Oxides activity.  Please take any notes that you may need for later from the content section and then complete the assignment.  You will submit your work to the dropboxthen you will do a self assessment and reflection and resubmit your corrected file.

Assignment – Start your project today… Due April 7th

Drop Box Complete the following assignment and submit your work to the dropbox.

Oxides have many different uses. Although many of them are considered negatively, oxides are essential to us. In this activity, you will conduct research into an oxide. .

Once you have completed your research, create a presentation (be as creative as you like – in which ever tool you would like to use) and submit your presentation to the dropbox – Activity 6, Assignment 1.  If it is a virtual presentation be sure to include the url address!  Also post your presentation on the “Oxides” post on http://learninghood.ca . Read a variety of the reports posted by your classmates and reply to the postings of 3 of your classmates (this does not mean you post ‘I agree’ or ‘Good Job’ – it must be meaningful!)

You may choose one of the following oxides as your topic. You can also find another oxide if you prefer. You must get your topic approved by Ms Faulkner before you start.

Possible topics:

  • greenhouse gasses (CO2)
  • smog (NO or NO2)
  • rust (Fe2O3)
  • sulphur dioxide (SO2) or sulphur trioxide (SO3)
  • hydrogen oxide (H2O)
  • lithium oxide batteries (Li2O)
  • hematite (Fe2O3), used as a pigment in mediaeval manuscripts
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